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  • #346377

    Anonymous

    Now I am also interested in one thing. :D

    In Slovenian we have the verbs vedeti (jaz vem) and znati (jaz znam). Their meaning is hard to explain in English as both kind of mean "to know", but absolutely not in the same manner. Here are a few examples of usage in Slovenian (excuse the silly sentences …)

    Vem kako ti je ime. Mar veš kakšno je vreme zunaj? Seveda vem, sončno in toplo je.
    Znam napraviti kruh, ne znam pa speči potice. Tudi beton znam zmešati.

    Torej, če nekaj vem, to znam narediti. Če pa nekaj znam, vem kako se to naredi. I hope I made the difference clear to you. When you veš, you know a fact, you know something. But when you znaš, you know how to do something, I can't explain it better in English. :(

    I am interested if your languages have both verbs aswell and if they mean the same as here. I think other South Slavic languages don't have it (except perhaps for Kajkavian dialects?) while West Slavic languages do, or? What about East Slavic? I've never come across this in Russian.

    #429793

    Anonymous

    Znam is more often used for something like "i can", "i am able to" hence the confusion. But the dictonary will explain it as "to know" for both vedeti and znati but usage and its meaning can be a bit different like mentioned.

    #429794

    Anonymous

    Third letter of the (glagolitic) alphabet! (maybe?)
    "Азъ Буки Веди, Глаголи Добро Есть, …"

    In bulgarian, it's not used anymore, however it remains in some words:
    For example, the word "linguist" : "езиковед" ("who knows the tongue")

    #429795

    Anonymous

    Slovak

    vedieť

    poznať

    Difference:

    Not that big, but they're often used in different situations. "Ja viem." means I know, but is more often used when you can something or you are able to do something, e.g. "Viem spievať." – I can sing. "Ja poznám." – means I know and is more often used when you know something, e.g. "Poznám túto pieseň." – I know this song.

    Word veda – a science comes from word vedieť. Vedec – a scientist. But vedomec – is, or rather was a folk healer, wizard, wise old man. Vedma – female 'vedomec'. From that comes Ded vševed – Old man who knows all.

    Word poviedka – a tale comes from verb povedať – to say, i.e. to say something you know (vedieť). "Vedieť povedať poviedku." – To be able to tell a tale.  :)

    #429796

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Slovak

    vedieť

    poznať

    Difference:

    Not that big, but they're often used in different situations. "Ja viem." means I know, but is more often used when you can something or you are able to do something, e.g. "Viem spievať." – I can sing. "Ja poznám." – means I know and is more often used when you know something, e.g. "Poznám túto pieseň." – I know this song.

    Word veda – a science comes from word vedieť. Vedec – a scientist. But vedomec – is, or rather was a folk healer, wizard, wise old man. Vedma – female 'vedomec'. From that comes Ded vševed – Old man who knows all.

    Word poviedka – a tale comes from verb povedať – to say, i.e. to say something you know (vedieť). "Vedieť povedať poviedku." – To be able to tell a tale.  :)

    Here poznati is used only, when you say that you know somebody, a song, a book or in a similar manner. It has the same meaning as the German kennen.

    We call science also veda or znanost, but a scientist can be called only znanstvenik, while vedec is somebody like a shaman, an old, experienced person who knows a lot.

    For that story word of yours we say pripovedka/pripoved/povest.

    #429797

    Anonymous

    In Russian:
    видеть: to see
    вести: to lead
    знать: to know
    уметь: to know how to, in the same manner as znaš

    I mentioned here "вести" is because it becomes "веду" in first person, but I'm not sure it's related…
    Examples (mine will be just as silly):

    -Я вижу море
    -Я веду палкой по полу
    -Я знаю Азбуку
    -Я умею писать

    See "вести" can be used in a pretty weird way, you "lead" the stick over the floor.

    #429798

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    In Russian:
    видеть: to see
    вести: to lead
    знать: to know
    уметь: to know how to, in the same manner as znaš

    I mentioned here "вести" is because it becomes "веду" in first person, but I'm not sure it's related…
    Examples (mine will be just as silly):

    -Я вижу море
    -Я веду палкой по полу
    -Я знаю Азбуку
    -Я умею писать

    See "вести" can be used in a pretty weird way, you "lead" the stick over the floor.

    We also have the word vest, but here it means "to behave". Neither yours nor mine are connected with the connected with the original problem, sadly … Umeti also seems similar to the Russian word you mentioned, though it is rather archaic here and not often used.

    I don't mean to be rude, but let's try to stick with the original question, which is "znati" and "vedeti" in Slavic languages. :)

    #429799

    Anonymous

    This is what wikipedia gives about вѣдѣти: http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%D0%B2%D1%A3%D0%B4%D1%A3%D1%82%D0%B8
    So apparently видеть & вести come indeed from that very same word. :)

    #429800

    Anonymous

    In Serbian:
    Videti – to see
    Znati – to know

    #429801

    Anonymous

    Viedać and znać in Belarusian. The words are used in different contexts. 

    ja jaho zusim nie viedaju — I don't know him at all.

    Or

    ja znaju Minsk, alie viedaju, što Minsk – stalica. I znaju Minsk, but I viedaju that Minsk is the capital city.

    Also,

    pryrodaznaŭstva — nature-study
    viedźma – witch


    Vedat' is also present in archaic Russian. Some words derived from vedat' still exist, such as

    природоведение (prirodovedeniye)— nature-study
    Ведомство (vedomstvo) – department.
    знать-не-знаю, ведать не ведаю – znat' ne znayu, vedat' ne vedayu (a common saying used in literature)

    #429802

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    So apparently видеть & вести come indeed from that very same word. :)

    Which reminds me, there's also the noun "Весть", which means "news" in Russian.
    Seems more related to how "vem" is used in other Slavic languages.

    #429803

    Anonymous

    In Polish there are:

    1. wiem (1st person, singular)/ wiedzieć (infinitive) – to know.

    Wiem, co się wczoraj stało – I know what happened yesterday
    Zawsze wiedziałem, że jesteś idiotą. – I always knew you are an idiot.

    2. znam (1st person, singular)/ znać (infinitive) – to know (different context)

    Znam ją ze szkoły – I know her from school.
    Znam ten epizod historii – I know this episode of the history.

    3. umiem, umieć/potrafię, potrafić – be able to or can

    Umiem wybudować dom – I can build a house.
    Potrafię sobie z tym poradzić – I am able to handle this.

    4. wiodę/wieść – to lead (According to Alexei's, but this is not silimar to znać, umieć, wiedzieć etc.)

    Nie wódź nas na pokuszenie – And lead us not into temptation.
    Wiedzie nas ku zwycięstwu – He/She lead us to the victory.

    There is also a noun, which means "news" – it seems it's like in Russian language.

    #429804

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Which reminds me, there's also the noun "Весть", which means "news" in Russian.
    Seems more related to how "vem" is used in other Slavic languages.

    We have that word too in Slovenian, but it is used only news you can hear or get written about a person or so. It isn't used for radio or TV news like the Serbo-Croatian aquivalent.

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