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  • #342480

    Anonymous

    Vražji boben is an old slovene instrument. Sadly it isnt used anymore or should i rather say that it is seen very rarely. It is made in such a way that if you beat this instrument on the ground it plays. Of course you also use drumstick and beat some of its parts with drumstick to make sounds.

    Vražji boben could be translated as The Devils Drum but in slovene language it could also mean The Shaman's Drum. Thats becouse we can conjugate word vrag as vražje (devils) but vraž in turn means shaman. In slovene vrag = devil and vraž or vražar = shaman or sorcerer.

    Vražji boben is actually wooden stick that is carved into a certain shape. It always has a head on the top or near the top. Oftenly head is made in a shape of a devil.

    Anyway this is example of Vražji boben in Slovene Ethnographic Museum;
    [img width=336 height=700]http://www.etno-muzej.si/files/oc/ljudska_glasbila/em%2018086_vrazji%20boben.jpg”/>

    More recent example of Vražji boben;
    image

    I have also seen on youtube some Czech musicians in Chodove region playing on almost entirely same instrument but i dont know how they call it. Becouse there is no video where we could hear Vražji boben i will show you how they play on this similar instrument in Chodove region;

    Konrádyho dudácká muzika – Folklórní festival, Plzeň, 2010

    #369114

    Anonymous

    I believe more Slavic nations use this instrument. As for Slovakia, we use the same but it is called ozembuch – which is translated as a bang against the ground (o-zem-buch). And it's not getting to "die out"  :D

    image

    image

    #369115

    Anonymous

    I believe more Slavic nations use this instrument. As for Slovakia, we use the same but it is called ozembuch – which is translated as a bang against the ground (o-zem-buch). And it's not getting to "die out"  :D

    Thats realy interesting. Thanks for info. I guess this is ancient slavic instrument. Anyone from other slavic lands please if you know anything about something similar, show us!

    Anway i am not affraid for future of Vražji boben becouse any instrument can be revived as long there are still old Vražji bobni in museums etc. and in some areas like second picture i inserted we can see that some people still use it.

    #369116

    Anonymous

    Hehe these two grandpa's have realy funny ozembuch. Check out its head.

    Otec a syn – Michalovia Klampárovci

    #369117

    Anonymous

    Heh it's actually father and his son  :)  The funny head is not regular part of ozembuch, they played at the Blood donation event so he put it on it probably because of children  :)

    I guess this is ancient slavic instrument.

    It originates in the Middle ages, I suppose it was initially without bells, only a big simple twig.. Just imagine, if you sing, you want to do other sounds during it, so you use a piece of timber and simply bang against something, most likely against the ground (oh, that's why it's ozembuch, its name supports my theory  ;D).

    #369118

    Anonymous

    The funny head is not regular part of ozembuch

    Yes its realy obvious but funny ;D

    It originates in the Middle ages

    Thats interesting but i wonder which period of middle ages? Early middle, high middle age, late middle age etc? After all middle age is long period. And is it in Slavic lands only or is it widespread?

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