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  • #345054

    Anonymous

    So relatively few people, even Slavic people, know our mythology. One reason may be because it is ultimately lost since our ancestors were illiterate. However Werewolves and Vampires are now a staple in cultural mythology, and from what I understand these two originated in Slavic mythology. The first Werewolves were from an ancient proto-Slavic tribe (the Neuri, I believe) who worshiped the wolf and had a festival where they dressed as wolves, and they were also cannibalistic. Vampires have been hailed as eastern European since as long as anyone can remember. I recall reading in old myth vampires were a serious threat to ancient Slavs. My question ultimately is: are these two, in fact, Slavic myth elements or general world mythology? I understand there are creatures similar to vampires as far away as China but I mean the classic Vampire: Undead, Bloodsucker, Weak to Sun and Garlic (which according to Wikipedia is Slavic myth). Werewolves I'm not as sure, but I've heard it said both are originally Slavic folklore.

    #410433

    Anonymous

    As far as I know. they are both of Slavic origin. But I'm not expert… I'm just an amateur lover of mythology.

    #410434

    Anonymous

    Werewolfs seem to be more general not just Slavic i guess as for vampires i don't have a clue. :D

    #410435

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    The first Werewolves were from an ancient proto-Slavic tribe (the Neuri, I believe) who worshiped the wolf and had a festival where they dressed as wolves

    there isnt much known about neuri and what you wrote is pretty much a fabulation  ;D

    #410436

    Anonymous

    Schafarik
    Schafarik believes the Neuri to have been ancestors of the Slavic peoples. The position assigned to their district appears to be about the head waters of the Dniester and Bug (Bugh) and the central course of the Dnieper just the region which, on general grounds, place-names, recorded migrations and modern distribution, appears to be the original location of the Slavs (q.v.). The wolf story again recalls the tales of werewolves so common among Slavonic peoples, and there is much probability in Schafarik's conjecture that the Neuri are nothing but the ancestors of the Slavs.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neuri

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vampires#Slavic_spiritualism

    #410437

    Anonymous

    šafarik lived in 19th century  :) so his views are irrelevant (historical science and archeology have progressed since then)
    moreover they are supposed to be pushed from that land 2500 years ago… its highly improbable that they would be slavs.

    #410438

    Anonymous

    Werewolves are, as Povhec already said, common for the folk demonology of the majority of European cultures. The stereotypical image of werewolves in contemporary popular culture is clearly derived from Germanic sources, so is the English word itself. No need to look for Slavic influence here.
    It's interesting that Slavic beliefs related to werewolves have some characteristics that aren't very common in other parts of the subcontinent, with the exception of the Baltic. They include, for instance, the ways a person turns into wolf (rolling over an aspen log/stump or three knives stuck into the ground; turned by the magic of a village "wise man" on a wedding), or the idea that werewolves are not necessarily malevolent and often suffer from their condition. These beliefs are spread mostly in the East Slavic areal and Poland, while Czech and Slovak werewolves are more similar to their Germanic counterparts (AFAIK, since I've never been able to find much information on them), and in South Slavic lands the terms derived from *vьlkodlakъ are applied to vampires, with the exception of North-Western Bulgaria, where vǎrkolak/vǎlkolak denotes a mythical wolf-like creature that eats the Sun and causes solar eclipses (that belief is also attested in Medieval Serbian and Russian sources), or a man that has been cursed since his birth to turn into a wolf on his wedding and eat his wife (the plot of several folk tales).

    Vampires are another story – while there are many typolgically similar undead creatures in plenty of cultures around the world, the word is borrowed in languages of Western Europe from Slavic (most likely from Serbian through Hungarian) sometime in the 18th century, and so are the main traits of the creature like bloodsucking, fear of the day and garlic etc., popularised by Bram Stoker.

    As for the Neuri, the unfortunate truth is we simply don't know who they were. There is a possibility that both Herodotus' account and the (much later) widespread "werewolf mythology" stem from real practices of pre-Christian Männerbünde, but that's about it. :)

    #410439

    Anonymous

    So basically can thank Bram Stokers Dracula book to screw up origin of Vampires at least in linguistic sense. >:(

    #410440

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    So basically can thank Bram Stokers Dracula book to screw up origin of Vampires at least in linguistic sense. >:(

    Well, vampires are very prominent in Romanian folklore as well (they go by the names strigoi and moroi, though), and there are also Hungarian mythical beings that share some of the traits of a vampire (namely the lidérc), so the association with these countries isn't generally wrong. But the ultimate source of these beliefs was Slavic, so were the most famous "vampiric" cases – the West learned about vampires mostly because of the "vampire epidemic" that occured after the Treaty of Požarevac in 18th century, when Ottoman Empire lost the main Serbian lands to Austria (the whole story with Peter Plogojowitz and Arnold Paole – google it if you don't know it already, it's rather fascinating). This is probably when the word was adopted in Hungarian and German, and later in French and English. At the time Stoker was writing Dracula, the word was already established in English language.

    #410441

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Well, vampires are very prominent in Romanian folklore as well (they go by the names strigoi and moroi, though), and there are also Hungarian mythical beings that share some of the traits of a vampire (namely the lidérc), so the association with these countries isn't generally wrong. But the ultimate source of these beliefs was Slavic, so were the most famous "vampiric" cases – the West learned about vampires mostly because of the "vampire epidemic" that occured after the Treaty of Požarevac in 18th century, when Ottoman Empire lost the main Serbian lands to Austria (the whole story with Peter Plogojowitz and Arnold Paole – google it if you don't know it already, it's rather fascinating). This is probably when the word was adopted in Hungarian and German, and later in French and English. At the time Stoker was writing Dracula, the word was already established in English language.

    Thx. Yea i meant in lingustic sence only but like you said origin is Slavic. Anyway they should make movie according to vampire epidemic. :D

    #410442

    Anonymous

    Well, I read about many types of vampires from different parts of the world. It's really interesting! After some time you get to know all the rituals, how to get rid of those nasty creatures, their vulnerabilities etc.
    Dearg-dur, Langsuir, Mulo, Polong, Vetala, Empuza, Vlokoslak, Bajang.. and many many other. Love to read about things like that!

    #410443

    Anonymous

    The word vampire is Slavic, it was first mentioned in the Balkan area in Serbia, as far as I know. Werevolves were also very common in slavic mythology, but both of these are present in every culture in the world and every mythology, but with a different name.

    #410444

    Anonymous

    word PIR means fire and UN is the negation, so they make Unpir, a being resistable to fire, that is a being captured in a human that hasn't been burned after death. Unpir evolved into Upír and Vampir.
    http://www.starisloveni.com/Vampir.html

    #410445

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    word PIR means fire and UN is the negation, so they make Unpir, a being resistable to fire, that is a being captured in a human that hasn't been burned after death. Unpir evolved into Upír and Vampir.
    http://www.starisloveni.com/Vampir.html

    This is one of the possible explanations. The etymology is unclear, however, and the word is kind of anomalous.
    *ǫpyrь can be explained as a result of Proto-Indo-European *péh₂wr 'fire, bonfire' plus a supposed Slavic negating prefix *ǫ; the meaning in this case would be "unburned", i.e. "improperly burried/dealt with the corpse". It should be noted that both this negation prefix and that particular IE term for fire are otherwise unattested in Slavic languages.
    An alternative etymology relates the word to Serbian and Croatian verb piriti 'to blow' (in South Slavic folklore the inflated, filled with blood body is one of the characteristic traits of the vampire, this was likely based on real observation of post-mortal changes); yet another one relates it with *netopyrь 'bat', which is itself of unclear etymology.

    #410446

    Anonymous

    In Eastern Slovakia used to live vampires known as slovenský nelapsi or just nelapsi, and they were one of the most strong vampire type on the world ;)

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