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  • #345976

    Anonymous

    I know that this is the Old Church Slavonic word for Jesus or Lord, but where did it come from, and why is it so different from any other name of Jesus?

    And why is it only the East slavic languages that use it?

    #424150

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I know that this is the Old Church Slavonic word for Jesus or Lord, but where did it come from, and why is it so different from any other name of Jesus?

    Господи  – literary Good God;  Gospod' – Lord derived from 'Gospodin. Gospodin –    Lord or Master.  The word 'Gospodin' was formed from  Gost ( guest) and  Potis (capable) as per the dictionary of etymology.

    And why is it only the East slavic languages that use it?

    It came from Old Church Slavonic, so Bulgarian and Macedonian languages may have the word too. Possibly other Slavic languages.

    #424151

    Anonymous

    Serbs and Croats use Gospod/Господ.

    #424152

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    And why is it only the East slavic languages that use it?

    That's not true, we have hospodin, too :)

    #424153

    Anonymous

    господи is vocative form of Господь which mean "oh  God", "oh Lord"

    Quote:
    Serbs and Croats use Gospod/Господ.

    Yes as nominative… but as vocativ is Господе/Gospode

    #424154

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    господи is vocative form of Господь which mean "oh  God", "oh Lord"

    Yes as nominative… but as vocativ is Господе/Gospode

    Exactly, Господи is vocative form of Господь in Russian, Old Church Slavonic and New Church Slavonic. Its one of few rare instances where vocative is preserved in Russian.

    In Serbian word Господ also exists, and like you said our nominative form is "Господе".

    There is distinction between Господ (Lord, in meaning of Allmighty God) and господин (lord, sir, master, mister).

    #424155

    Anonymous

    What's vocative? If it's a vocative case, then it doesn't exist in modern Russian. It exists in Ukrainian among eastern Slavic langauges.

    In modern Russian 'Gospodi' is an exclamation or interjection which literary means Dear God or Good God etc.

    #424156

    Anonymous

    its a relict of vocative.
    vocative case is used when addressing someone, e. g. ženo, poc hev (from žena)

    and yes, hospodi/gospodi is a vocative case form of hospod/gospod.

    edit: and this form (gospod/hospod) is used in all slavic languages whose speakers use (used) church slavic as a liturgical language.
    catholics, calvinists and lutherans use hospodin (nominative case)

    #424157

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    What's vocative? If it's a vocative case, then it doesn't exist in modern Russian.

    Its relict of old times. Vocative is preserved in Russian in few isolated cases, mostly those related with religion. ("Боже", "Иисусе, "Отче наш", "владыко" etc)

    Quote:
    In Russian Gospodi is an exclamation Literary Dear God or Good God etc.

    Vocative by defintion is used for exclamation, and calling :)

    #424158

    Anonymous

    Господи is a vocative form of Gospod'. In modern Russian "Gospodi"  usually means 'Dear God' in exclamation form,  although in some cases in may mean God.  Other vocative forms are 'Отче' (Father) or 'Иисусе' (Jesus)  (Иисус is in nominative case).  :)

    #424159

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    its a relict of vocative.

    Okay! :)

    #424160

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    And why is it only the East slavic languages that use it?

    Well, the Slovene language uses gospod and gospa. The first is obviously only a shortened form of gospodin, though it is pronounced differently by us than f.ex. by the Russians or so …

    #424161

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Well, the Slovene language uses gospod and gospa. The first is obviously only a shortened form of gospodin, though it is pronounced differently by us than f.ex. by the Russians or so …

    Acctually, gospodin originated from gospod not other way arround. -in is Ancient Slavonic sufix for building nuon. It was used to make singular (Like Serbian: Србин, from root Срб, but plural is Срби). Thing is, our ancestors decided to use Господ just for one Lord :D, that way they avoided confusion like in other languages.

    #424162

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Acctually, gospodin originated from gospod not other way arround. -in is Ancient Slavonic sufix for building nuon. It was used to make singular (Like Serbian: Србин, from root Срб, but plural is Срби). Thing is, our ancestors decided to use Господ just for one Lord :D, that way they avoided confusion like in other languages.

    Oh, my mistake then … ;D

    #424163

    Anonymous

    Etymology
    From earlier *gostьpodь, a compound of *gostь and the unreconstructible *podь. The only direct Indo-European cognate is Latin hospes (“guest, visitor; host, entertainer”), which would render the supposed Proto-Indo-European reconstruction as *gʰost(i)potis, a compound of *gʰóstis and *pótis.

    Noun
    *gospodь m
    lord
    master

    Declension
    of *gospodь
    Derived terms
    *gospodьnъ
    *gospoďa
    *gospoda

    Related terms
    *gospodinъ
    *gospodyni
    *gostь

    Descendants
    East Slavic:
    Old East Slavic: господь (gospodĭ)
    Russian: Госпо́дь (Gospódʹ)
    Ukrainian: го́сподь (hóspodʹ)
    South Slavic:
    Old Church Slavonic:
    Cyrillic: господь (gospodĭ)
    Glagolitic: image (gospodĭ)
    Bulgarian: Господ (Gospod)
    Macedonian: Господ (Gospod)
    Serbo-Croatian:
    Cyrillic: Господ
    Latin: Gȍspod
    Slovene: gospód
    West Slavic:
    Old Czech: hospod
    Polish: gospód (dialectal)

    Interjection
    господи (góspodi, hóspodi)
    vocative singular form of Господь (Gospódʹ) "God", "Lord"
    oh my God!, oh my Lord!
    Synonyms
    Господе (Gospode)
    о боже! (o bóže!)
    боже мой! (bóže moj!)

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