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  • #341671

    Anonymous

    Map:

    image

    Their flag:

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    Their emblem:

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    Some basic overview:

    Transnistria, also known as Trans-Dniestr or Transdniestria is a breakaway territory located mostly on a strip of land between the Dniester River and the eastern Moldovan border to Ukraine. Since its declaration of independence in 1990, and especially after the War of Transnistria in 1992, it is governed de facto as the Pridnestrovian Moldavian Republic (PMR, also known as "Pridnestrovie"), an unrecognized state which claims the territory to the east of the river Dniester as well as the city of Bender and its surrounding localities located on the west bank. The modern Republic of Moldova does not recognize the secession and considers territories controlled by the PMR to be part of Moldova's autonomous region of Stînga Nistrului ("Left Bank of the Dniester").Transnistria's sovereignty is unrecognized by any United Nations member state and it has no diplomatic relations with them.

    After the dissolution of the USSR, tensions between the Moldovan government and the breakaway unrecognized state's authorities in Tiraspol escalated into a military conflict that started in March 1992 and was concluded by a ceasefire in July 1992. As part of that agreement, a three-party (Russia, Moldova, Transnistria) Joint Control Commission supervises the security arrangements in the demilitarized zone, comprising 20 localities on both sides of the river. Although the ceasefire has held, the territory's political status remains unresolved: commonly considered De jure part of Moldova, Transnistria is a de facto independent state. It is organized as a presidential republic, with its own government, parliament, military, police, postal system, and currency. Its authorities have adopted a constitution, flag, national anthem, and a coat of arms. However, following a 2005 agreement between Moldova and Ukraine, all Transnistrian companies seeking to export goods through the Ukrainian border must be registered with the Moldovan authorities. This agreement was implemented after EUBAM started its activity in 2006. Most Transnistrians are Moldovan citizens, but there are also many Transnistrians with Russian and Ukrainian citizenship.

    Transnistria is sometimes compared with other post-Soviet frozen conflict zones such as Nagorno-Karabakh, Abkhazia, and South Ossetia. The latter two have recognised Transnistria as an independent state and have established diplomatic relations in return for Transnistria's recognition of them (see Community for Democracy and Rights of Nations).

    Demographics:

    In total, in the areas controlled by the breakaway authorities of Tiraspol, there are 555,347 people, including 177,635 Moldovans (31.99%), 168,678 Russians (30.37%), 160,069 Ukrainians (28.82%), 13,858 Bulgarians (2.50%), 4,096 Gagauzians (0.74%), 507 Gypsies (Roma) (0.09%), 1,259 Jews (0.23%), 1,791 Poles (0.32%), and 27,454 others (4.94%).

    #351370

    Anonymous

    Hold referendum in both Moldavia and Transnistria, about their future let people decide. As I see it, most of Moldavians would like to merge with Romania, while Transnistrians enjoy their de facto independency.

    "According to the Transnistrian referendum, 2006, carried out by the PMR government, the population voted overwhelmingly in favor of "independence from Moldova and free association with Russia." "

    #351371

    Anonymous

    Thing is that between Transnistria and Russia is Ukraine.  ;)

    #351372

    Anonymous

    It's not a problem, same situation is with Kaliningrad Oblast, Latvia and Lithuania are between them and Russia.

    #351373

    Anonymous

    Also true. Didn't think about that.

    #351374

    Anonymous

    Too little to be independent, too many Moldavnians live there to be Ukranian…And is historically Moldavian territory

    #351375

    Anonymous

    Ethnically Ukrainian parts should join with Ukraine.

    #351376

    Anonymous

    Wikileaks, 2008: Basescu told US he was not ruling out military conflict with Russia in Transnistria

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    In a meeting with US Senator Richard Lugar in Bucharest on August 27, 2008, President Traian Basescu voiced concerns that Romania could be drawn into a military conflict with Russia in Transnistria, following a similar scenario with what had happened in Georgia earlier that month, according to a cable of the US embassy in Bucharest, released by Wikileaks on September 1, according to Gandul.

    If Russia launched the provocation in Transnistria, Basescu said Romania would have had to face some “very tough options.” In his personal comment, then US Ambassador Nicholas Taubman wrote that Basescu “clearly worries” about the possibility and the fact such a Russian provocation “may practically require a Romanian military response.”

    On the other hand Basescu said he was “shocked” by the immense lack of maturity Georgian government “adventurers” showed when they answered Russia’s provocations. Known as the five-day war, Georgia’s invasion by Russia happened on August 8, 2008, under the pretext that Georgian troops had attacked Russians in South Ossetia.

    Basescu also wondered if Georgia’s blunders and its weak military actions could have been intentional, in order to determine NATO to intervene on behalf of Georgia.

    http://www.bucharestherald.ro/dailyevents/41-dailyevents/25967-wikileaks-2008-basescu-told-us-he-was-not-ruling-ouit-military-conflict-with-russia-in-transnistria

    #351377

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Ethnically Ukrainian parts should join with Ukraine.

    Likely, the problem there is that there is no clearly Ukrainian part nor is there any region of the country that it clearly populated by one ethnic group. There is always a mix in these regions, not just of people, but also of ideas. That was the reason they split in the first place. Further splitting just to favor one group of people will only lead to more problems. People really need to learn to get along, especially since the groups living here have been neighbors for a long time. And this region is so small that it should go back to Moldova and minority right must be respected. There is nothing odd about ethnic mix in border regions. Most other Slavic nations have that and they don't have breakaways in those regions.

    #351378

    Anonymous
    Quote:

    Quote:
    Ethnically Ukrainian parts should join with Ukraine.

    Likely, the problem there is that there is no clearly Ukrainian part nor is there any region of the country that it clearly populated by one ethnic group. There is always a mix in these regions, not just of people, but also of ideas. That was the reason they split in the first place. Further splitting just to favor one group of people will only lead to more problems. People really need to learn to get along, especially since the groups living here have been neighbors for a long time. And this region is so small that it should go back to Moldova and minority right must be respected. There is nothing odd about ethnic mix in border regions. Most other Slavic nations have that and they don't have breakaways in those regions.

    Sorry, but there is no way that I will accept that Jewish neo-communists, Moskals and Romanians rule a part of my people. There are many parts in Transnistria and the rest of Moldova with clear Ukrainian majority and they should best join Ukraine.

    #351379

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Sorry, but there is no way that I will accept that Jewish neo-communists, Moskals and Romanians rule a part of my people. There are many parts in Transnistria and the rest of Moldova with clear Ukrainian majority and they should best join Ukraine.

    Well, there are about 300,000 Poles in the west of Belarus, a nation ruled by "Jewish neo-communists" and also probably Moskals. Encouraging a breakaway or joining of Poland there would be pretty much an act of war. Commies suck, but those under them should work to bring them down in the region where they are ruled by them and not just breakaway and leave the problem to someone else. Anyway, in Transnisria "joining Ukraine" would not be so simple and not just an easy 1-2-3 "breaking away." The Ukrainians there, should work with the other groups who wish to see change in the region.

    And what would be so bad about a Ukrainian minority in Romania? The Romanians hate the Soviet legacy as much as anyone and are logical allies for Ukraine and pretty much all Slavs if a greater Slavic coalition is ever to be formed.

    #351380

    Anonymous
    Quote:

    Quote:
    Sorry, but there is no way that I will accept that Jewish neo-communists, Moskals and Romanians rule a part of my people. There are many parts in Transnistria and the rest of Moldova with clear Ukrainian majority and they should best join Ukraine.

    Well, there are about 300,000 Poles in the west of Belarus, a nation ruled by "Jewish neo-communists" and also probably Moskals. Encouraging a breakaway or joining of Poland there would be pretty much an act of war.

    This is a different case. Belarus is an old nation-state with a titular nation and a lot of history while Moldova and Transnistria are just artificial Soviet creations where three different nationalities are lumped together.

    Commies suck, but those under them should work to bring them down in the region where they are ruled by them and not just breakaway and leave the problem to someone else.

    This is true in cases like Belarus: the relations between Poles and Belarussians are pretty good as far as I know so the Polish minority and Belarussians have common ground to cooperate against Jewkashenko who mistreats both of them. In Moldova and Transnistria this is not the case: Ukrainians will follow Ukrainian interests, Romanians Romanian interests and Russians Muscovian interests – there is simply no common ground for cooperation.

    And what would be so bad about a Ukrainian minority in Romania? The Romanians hate the Soviet legacy as much as anyone and are logical allies for Ukraine and pretty much all Slavs if a greater Slavic coalition is ever to be formed.

    Romanians treat us with condescension or even hate us and claim large parts of our land. I do not want my fellow Ukrainians to fall under their rule as much as I do not want them to fall under Muscovian rule.

    #351381

    Anonymous

    You make some good points. The thing is that Transnistria is a small region, too small to be independent. It will inevitably end up as either a protectorate of a neighboring larger state – in this case Moldova or Ukraine. Or it will dissolve, probably the best solution if it is peacefully along the national lines, Moldovans to Moldova, Ukrainians to Ukraine, etc…

    I just fear that someone will exploit this as a political powder keg and cause another crisis as South Ossetia was in August 2008. Certainly, the current leadership in Moscow would be all for a crisis here, so that they'll have the perfect pretext for increased military presence and a return to the old Soviet sphere of influence/coercion.

    #351382

    Anonymous

    I found this video about Transdniestria, a little bit of an older video but still a good one. Most importantly it shows how independent it is from Moldova and even some say it's better on that side of the river.

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