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  • #345326

    Anonymous

    I have both Polish & Ukrainian heritage and I am wanting to learn a Slavic language.
    Its out of Polish, Ukrainian.

    Which language do you think I should learn ?

    #415382

    Anonymous

    Learn Ukrainian:

    1) It must be easier for you.
    2) You will learn Cyrillic.
    3) You'll be able to learn Polish and/or Russian more easily afterwards.

    #415383

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Learn Ukrainian:

    1) It must be easier for you.
    2) You will learn Cyrillic.
    3) You'll be able to learn Polish and/or Russian more easily afterwards.

    What are the major differences between the Belarusian, Ukrainian and Russian alphabets ?

    #415384

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    What are the major differences between the Belarusian, Ukrainian and Russian alphabets ?

    They aren't really significant.

    BE – UK – RU:

    1) Іі – Іі – Ии
    2) Ыы – Ии – Ыы
    3) Ее – Єє – Ее
    4) Ээ – Ее – Ээ
    5) [ _ ] – Щщ – Щщ
    6) Ўў – [ _ ] – [ _ ]
    7) [ _ ] – Її – [ _ ]
    8) [ _ ] – [ _ ] – Ъъ

    #415385

    Anonymous

    I would go with Polish, more economic opportunities will make it easier for you to use the language.  Plus, you will be killing 2 birds with one stone.  Learn a Slavic language, while making it possible to immigrate to a relatively wealthier country if you ever chose to do so.

    #415386

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I would go with Polish, more economic opportunities will make it easier for you to use the language.  Plus, you will be killing 2 birds with one stone.  Learn a Slavic language, while making it possible to immigrate to a relatively wealthier country if you ever chose to do so.

    I agree. Thanks for your opinion. 

    Quote:
    They aren't really significant.

    BE – UK – RU:

    1) Іі – Іі – Ии
    2) Ыы – Ии – Ыы
    3) Ее – Єє – Ее
    4) Ээ – Ее – Ээ
    5) [ _ ] – Щщ – Щщ
    6) Ўў – [ _ ] – [ _ ]
    7) [ _ ] – Її – [ _ ]
    8) [ _ ] – [ _ ] – Ъъ

    Thanks for that :)

    #415387

    Anonymous

    IMHO you should at first ask yourself, why do you want to learn one of them. Is it only because of heritage? Or do you want to visit one of these more often? Do you have some relatives or connections in one of these countries? Do you want read literature or watch movies in one of these languages? Etc., etc. … Then you can decide.

    If it's only because of your heritage, then it probably doesn't matter, which one you choose. If you want use it regularly, than you will probably have more chances with polish (and you also find more learning materials for polish), but it's all on you and your possibilities and opportunities.

    Personally I learned myself polish (and it was good decision:-)), but I started in different situation than you.

    #434991

    Anonymous

    The guys and gals above have provided good answers to you. Just in case you choose to learn Ukrainian here’s a great site that will help you get off the ground by using high-frequency hardly-ever-taught-at-schools vocab http://www.funkyukrainian.com

    #425741

    Anonymous

    I would learn whichever one sounds, looks, and feels better for you, if you’re doing it for fun.

    #425735

    Anonymous

    I’ve never learned Ukrainain and I can understand it. I can also write in Ukrainian. The same goes for Russian and Polish. I have to say Polish is the most difficult language outside of east Slavic languages for me. I’ve little knowledge about Czech, Slovak and south Slavic languages.

    If you learn Ukrainian properly , you will be able to understand Belarusian and Russian too. Among west Slavic languages Polish is most similar to east Slavic languages. But unless you learn Polish or you are really good at east Slavic languages, you will struggle to understand Polish.

    #446479

    Anonymous

    @Sviatogor 

    Among west Slavic languages Polish is most similar to east Slavic languages

    Polish people may be the closest to east slavs genetically and Belarusian and Ukrainian have similarities with polish due to heavy polish influence in their languages but I would say Slovak is closer to Russian. Why? Experience and from hearing Russian speakers who have ever had contact with the two tell me so. I worked in a hotel this summer and had a lot of contact with Russian guests. Sometimes they couldn’t speak German or English. My coworker would try to explain stuff in Polish but they would get jack. When I spoke Slovak to them they were able to understand. This was the case at least three times working this summer. A good friend of mine who is Russian (half Tatar) also has been in Slovakia and Poland and told me she understood far more from Slovak than polish. 

    #446481

    Anonymous

    I’d agree with @Sviatogor, mainly because Ukrainian is easier to learn than Polish.  Both languages share a lot of vocabulary, but Ukrainian is better imho because it opens more opportunities for understanding other Slavic languages, such as Russian, Slovak, and surrounding languages (and apparently Macedonian and Bulgarian, as one friend of mine from Macedonia told me when we last saw each other).  However, you do you.  I’ll still recommend Ukrainian over Polish any day.  Love both languages nonetheless.

    #446482

    Anonymous

    @srdceleva

    A good friend of mine who is Russian (half Tatar) also has been in
    Slovakia and Poland and told me she understood far more from Slovak than
    polish.

    Slovak has easier phonology.

    #446483

    Anonymous

    @”Kapitán Denis” yes but also root words haven’t phonetically changed as much in Slovak and Russian as they have in Polish 

    Take the word bee for example
    Slovak- včela
    Russian-pčela 
    Polish- pszczoła 

    The whole polish language is like this, obviously you can’t base an analysis off of one word but even basic structure words like “bude(t)” is basically same in both Russian and Slovak then you have polish będzie. When the entire language is like this I don’t think polish is closer to Russian than Slovak. If it weren’t for polish influence on Ukrainian I also doubt polish would be closer

    #446484

    Anonymous

    In Belarusian – budzie and pčala.

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