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  • #343873

    Anonymous
    If we were assigned names once we reached full adulthood based on our characters and our merits, which Slavic name would you be given?  Are you destined for glory like Stanislav?  Are you a peaceful leader like Vladimir?  Are you dear to the people like Ludmila?  Are you a glorious leader like Vladislav?  Are you a healer of your household like Domagoj? Are you hopeful like Nadežda?  Are you a fighter like Borislav?  Are you a disturber of peace like Kazimir?  Are you a lover of God like Bogumil?      

    Personally, I think the name I would be given is Niemir, which means “restless”. 

    #436190

    Anonymous

    Nemiren is restless Niemir is more like “restlessness”
    Btw, did you know, linguists contributed a lot to mathematics. The connection is intriguing.

    #436193

    Anonymous

    I’m Spatimil because I love to sleep a lot. :D

    #436195

    Anonymous

     Are you a peaceful leader like Vladimir?

    :D

    #436196

    Anonymous

    I’m fond of Vojtech, myself.

    #436203

    Anonymous

    @aaaaa

    Of course, I guess I wrote down a simplified English translation, but you’re right, Niemir is “restlessness”.  I think to be named “the embodiment of restlessness” or “the embodiment of struggle” is much more badass, actually. :D

    If we still used the word “mir” in Polish, we would say “niemirny” (these days it’s “niespokojny”). 

    As far as the math and linguistics connection is concerned, that’s the idea I got when I first took linear algebra.  Very intriguing indeed.

    @texczech82

    My dad wanted to name me Wojciech.  Good name.  So you rejoice in battle? 

    #436206

    Anonymous

    I just realized I can’t think of a Slavic word for history. So I guess I’d go with Mnogoznayko, with everything that this entails…

    #436216

    Anonymous

    @Nasięgniew

    You could say that about me in my youth, i suppose. Now i rejoice far more in bsrbecues.

    #436218

    Anonymous

    NikeBG
    In Croatian (and to some extent Bosnian) ‘povijest’ exists as a Slavic replacement for the word ‘historija’.

    #436221

    Anonymous

    @Svevlad 

    Is it a word that preceded “historija” (had the same meaning) or was it adapted later as an alternative?  In Polish we have a similar word “powieść” which means roughly novel or story.   

    #436222

    Anonymous

    @Nasięgniew
    It has the same meaning in Slovak.
    We have two words for history – história and dejiny.

    #436226

    Anonymous

    Nasięgniew
    I’m not 100 percent sure, but it probably came after. 

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