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  • #342452

    Anonymous

    [size=14pt]Who works the longest hours in Europe?[/size]

    Hint: it's not Germany. Find out how many hours people work in different jobs and across the EU

    UPDATE: this now includes productivity figures for each country, too

    As Europe's leaders gather to discuss how to rescue the mediterranean economies and safeguard
    the single currency, it's tempting to resort to crude national stereotypes of prudent, hard-working
    Germans and lazy Greeks.

    But the Office for National Statistics seems to be on a mission to rescue us from our own prejudices.
    New data published this morning shows that Greek workers actually put in longer hours than anyone
    else in Europe — 42.2 per week, compared to just 35.6 in Germany. If you look at full-time figures,
    it is even starker.

    There are the usual caveats about the reliability of Greek statistics; but that looks like too large a gap
    to be explained away by dodgy number-crunching. With youth unemployment at 43.5%, Greeks these
    days must feel lucky to hold on to a job at all; but the news that they've been grafting away, helps to
    explain why the Greek general public don't feel they should be blamed for causing the crisis.

    Workers in the UK are in the middle of the pack, working 36.3 hours, about an hour a week less than
    the EU average; but the ONS points out that's because of the growing prevalence of part-time work,
    as flexible hours have become more common. If you look at full-time work, it puts us the top of the
    biggest economies in the region.

    As some of you have pointed out below, a better indicator of work completed may be productivity, and
    that does show a different picture. If you look at productivity per hour worked, via Eurostat, then the UK
    is bang in the middle, with Greece much further down the pack. The leaders then are Luxembourg and
    the Netherlands and France and Germany are in the top division.

    Source: http://www.guardian.co.uk/news/datablog/2011/dec/08/europe-working-hoursincludes data tables

    According to this, Poland is rather busy, but not very productive…

    #369004

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    [size=14pt]Who works the longest hours in Europe?[/size]

    Hint: it's not Germany. Find out how many hours people work in different jobs and across the EU

    UPDATE: this now includes productivity figures for each country, too

    As Europe's leaders gather to discuss how to rescue the mediterranean economies and safeguard
    the single currency, it's tempting to resort to crude national stereotypes of prudent, hard-working
    Germans and lazy Greeks.

    But the Office for National Statistics seems to be on a mission to rescue us from our own prejudices.
    New data published this morning shows that Greek workers actually put in longer hours than anyone
    else in Europe — 42.2 per week, compared to just 35.6 in Germany. If you look at full-time figures,
    it is even starker.

    There are the usual caveats about the reliability of Greek statistics; but that looks like too large a gap
    to be explained away by dodgy number-crunching. With youth unemployment at 43.5%, Greeks these
    days must feel lucky to hold on to a job at all; but the news that they've been grafting away, helps to
    explain why the Greek general public don't feel they should be blamed for causing the crisis.

    Workers in the UK are in the middle of the pack, working 36.3 hours, about an hour a week less than
    the EU average; but the ONS points out that's because of the growing prevalence of part-time work,
    as flexible hours have become more common. If you look at full-time work, it puts us the top of the
    biggest economies in the region.

    As some of you have pointed out below, a better indicator of work completed may be productivity, and
    that does show a different picture. If you look at productivity per hour worked, via Eurostat, then the UK
    is bang in the middle, with Greece much further down the pack. The leaders then are Luxembourg and
    the Netherlands and France and Germany are in the top division.

    Source: http://www.guardian.co.uk/news/datablog/2011/dec/08/europe-working-hoursincludes data tables

    According to this, Poland is rather busy, but not very productive…

    Fake…Very Fake! Here in Hungary, there a lot of days, when people had to work overtime (12 hours instad of 8) at least twice in a week… As for my working place, the last month it was all day 12 hours… Wich means 60 hours in  week! And I not said anything about working in Satrudays… 12 of course… Any questions?

    #369005

    Anonymous
    Quote:

    Quote:
    [size=14pt]Who works the longest hours in Europe?[/size]

    Hint: it's not Germany. Find out how many hours people work in different jobs and across the EU

    UPDATE: this now includes productivity figures for each country, too

    As Europe's leaders gather to discuss how to rescue the mediterranean economies and safeguard
    the single currency, it's tempting to resort to crude national stereotypes of prudent, hard-working
    Germans and lazy Greeks.

    But the Office for National Statistics seems to be on a mission to rescue us from our own prejudices.
    New data published this morning shows that Greek workers actually put in longer hours than anyone
    else in Europe — 42.2 per week, compared to just 35.6 in Germany. If you look at full-time figures,
    it is even starker.

    There are the usual caveats about the reliability of Greek statistics; but that looks like too large a gap
    to be explained away by dodgy number-crunching. With youth unemployment at 43.5%, Greeks these
    days must feel lucky to hold on to a job at all; but the news that they've been grafting away, helps to
    explain why the Greek general public don't feel they should be blamed for causing the crisis.

    Workers in the UK are in the middle of the pack, working 36.3 hours, about an hour a week less than
    the EU average; but the ONS points out that's because of the growing prevalence of part-time work,
    as flexible hours have become more common. If you look at full-time work, it puts us the top of the
    biggest economies in the region.

    As some of you have pointed out below, a better indicator of work completed may be productivity, and
    that does show a different picture. If you look at productivity per hour worked, via Eurostat, then the UK
    is bang in the middle, with Greece much further down the pack. The leaders then are Luxembourg and
    the Netherlands and France and Germany are in the top division.

    Source: http://www.guardian.co.uk/news/datablog/2011/dec/08/europe-working-hoursincludes data tables

    According to this, Poland is rather busy, but not very productive…

    Fake…Very Fake! Here in Hungary, there a lot of days, when people had to work overtime (12 hours instad of 8) at least twice in a week… As for my working place, the last month it was all day 12 hours… Wich means 60 hours in  week! And I not said anything about working in Satrudays… 12 of course… Any questions?

    Find a new job you poor sod :D

    #369006

    Anonymous
    Quote:

    Quote:

    Quote:
    [size=14pt]

    Find a new job you poor sod :D

    That is not easy, especially in the end of the year, and the start of a new one… Even worse, I live in one of the most dead parts of Hungary… No city near, only one, but that is dead too, only shops, but no factory work in. Planning to leave this country but that of is not easy as well… :/

    #369007

    Anonymous

    Greeks get a paid 4 hour siesta  ;D  They work harder than the rest of us  :-X

    #369008

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Greeks get a paid 4 hour siesta  ;D  They work harder than the rest of us  :-X

    Yes, that is why they rebel… From gold to iron I would say for them…

    #369009

    Anonymous

    Fucking lazy med bastards…

    #369010

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Greeks get a paid 4 hour siesta  ;D  They work harder than the rest of us  :-X

    Paid 4 hours of beach sex and fresh feta?

    Not bad… for national bankruptcy.

    #369011

    Anonymous

    I'm sure they get a siesta but hours alone does not equal to productivity.  As far as we know, Greeks are probably taking a 'smoke break' every 20 minutes.

    #369012

    Anonymous
    Quote:

    Quote:
    Greeks get a paid 4 hour siesta  ;D  They work harder than the rest of us  :-X

    Paid 4 hours of beach sex and fresh feta?

    Not bad… for national bankruptcy.

    The guys invented democracy, they know all the shortcuts to the game. No work just play. The Germans as it seems, suck in it, they do all the work until they go mad, and roll back to dictatorship every few years and make a general reset.

    #369013

    Anonymous

    Swedes are fairly hardworking, but they don't really go apeshit imperialist nuts, ever. They have cute girls. Tension relieved the peaceful way. And their sense of "empire" is much like Poland's… a thing of the past. No active nationalist movement tried to rebuild a great empire or Reich. Only some Germans and Russians bother with that.

    #369014

    Anonymous
    Quote:

    Quote:
    Greeks get a paid 4 hour siesta  ;D  They work harder than the rest of us  :-X

    Paid 4 hours of beach sex and fresh feta?

    Not bad… for national bankruptcy.

    Here, gypsies paid for no work, and also they go to take the money by BMW, or Mercedes, Audi… With golden neklances,etc that even an old Pharaoh would jealous…

    #369015

    Anonymous

    The British work very hard and it makes people neurotic and on edge.

    #369016

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    The British work very hard and it makes people neurotic and on edge.

    Just come to Hungary, especially the eastern, romanized lands, and you will change your opinion…

    #369017

    Anonymous

    When I've worked in Germany we stopped for a two hour break at luchtime. Even the stores and post offices closed for two hours in the smaller towns. And on Fridays everybody quits a couple of hours early. They call it "Fri-abend." So the Germans are just like the Jews, they quite early on Friday afternoon in order to prepare for the sabbath which begins on Friday 6 Oclock. Weird hey!

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