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  • #346899

    Anonymous

    I was recently reminded of an interesting Bulgarian documentary movie I watched a decade ago on our national television. I found it quite interesting back then and it probably helped me start seeing (or at least trying to see) from the eyes not only of my own country, but also from those of our neighbour Balkaners. It is a movie, in which the author sets on a quest to discover, if not the origins, then at least the different versions of one single melody, performed as different songs in pretty much all Balkan countries, with each country claiming it as their own (spoiler: except for the Macedonians, apparently, which was especially surprizing :P). What makes it even more interesting for me today, long after I had first seen the movie, is that the melody appears to go even quite beyond our region's boundaries – some claim it's Armenian in origin, or Jewish, or written by a Scottish composer for the Ottoman sultan, there are versions of it also in Romania, Ukraine and even Bangladesh, and one comment in the video below just now directed me to a 16th century Italian tune, La Mantovana, which does indeed seem to have an interesting resemblance.

    So, without further ado, here is the video:
    Чия Е Тази Песен/Whose Is This Song

    Note: While I generally am still intrigued by this documentary, I'll note that I have two main objections to it:
    First, the general idea itself is somewhat incorrect, as the author claims *the song* is the same, whereas only the melody is actually the same – the songs are different in each country and there are often even several such songs in each country. The difference in question is that melody does not equal song, as a song is a melody *and* a text. And in each version of those songs, the text is different, thus the songs are separate and different as well. Only their melody is the same.
    Second, the most notorious part of the movie – unexplainably provocative behaviour of the author towards the Serbian and Bulgarian cases. In the Serbian case, she plays a Bosnian militarist version of the song in a pub (which is outright stupid) and then includes the patrons' response in the movie, although that was far from necessary, especially since it was indeed her own fault of lack of tact. A similar case happens in Bulgaria, where she goes to a patriotic celebration in Strandzha (where that song is regarded as the anthem of the Strandzha Mountain) and tells them that the song is Turkish – no interviews with musicians and singers like in the other countries, just a provocation for the nationalists and their "barbaric" response.

    So, what do you think? Can Balkaners (and South Slavs in particular) actually agree to share something or will we always "pull the rug only towards ourselves"?

    Edit: Hah, only now I realized there's also a similarity with Boney M's "Rasputin". :D

    #434363

    Anonymous

    I've seen it and agree with you on both counts – while she does bring up an interesting question about culture and things we perceive as "our own", it was an attempt to browbeat nationalists. Another case of liberal xenophilia.

    #434364

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Edit: Hah, only now I realized there's also a similarity with Boney M's "Rasputin". :D

    It's extremely funny you say that because a while ago I was trying to find where Boney M had find that melody (not that I doubt in their creativity, I like them very much!) and I came across this very song, the discussion about the which country it came from and eventually this documentary.

    I'm very not surprisingly disappointed by it, especially the end. After all, you can't win so many awards without humiliating yourself and putting down your own kind.

    Quote:
    “Whose is this song?” was nominated by the European Film Academy for Best Documentary Film 2003 and won several awards: a Special Jury Prize at the Golden Rython Festival 2003 – the FIPRESCI Award and Silver Conch Prize 2004 – the Gibson Impact of Music prize 2004 – the Prix Bartok 2004 and the Silver Knight Award 2005.

    Long live the servitude!

    #434365

    Anonymous

    And write it in Bulgarian, because I'm not sure if I want others to understand. Taaaa, I think that this Ladies (director in December ..) decided to flutters in Europe at the expense of the common people. May appears that edisntveniyat way to show his nose was out to screw around quite plenty of sanaroditsite and a few other patriotic people as stupid it sounds. Such hatred is raging that straight I was ashamed to finish the film. Honestly tell you I gently lifted by two ladies …

    #434366

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    И това ще го напиша на български, защото не съм сигурен дали искам останалите да го разберат. Тъъъъ, струва ми се, че тази уважаема госпожа (режисьорката де..) е решила да се развява по Европата за сметка на простолюдието. Май излиза, че едиснтвеният начин да си покаже носа навън е бил да поплюе доста обилно на сънародиците си и на малкото родолюбиви хора останали колкото и тъпо това да звучи. Такава омраза се е развихрила, че направо ме беше срам да довърша филма. Честно да ви кажа, леко ми се повдига от такива дами…

    I do not think ours is a phenomenon – it is quite in the spirit of t. Called. "Political correctness" which is popular in the west.

    #434368

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Second, the most notorious part of the movie – unexplainably provocative behaviour of the author towards the Serbian and Bulgarian cases. In the Serbian case, she plays a Bosnian militarist version of the song in a pub (which is outright stupid) and then includes the patrons' response in the movie, although that was far from necessary, especially since it was indeed her own fault of lack of tact.

    http://youtu.be/hoNfQjEFr2c?t=57m46s

    [size=18pt]hahahahaha look at their faces!!!! >:( :-X 😮 yeah they were pissed[/size]

    Quote:
    So, what do you think? Can Balkaners (and South Slavs in particular) actually agree to share something or will we always "pull the rug only towards ourselves"?

    a lot has changed since 2003, nineties rhetoric is rarely heard nowadays (although it is still present) people have moved on with their lives and "interethnic" relations have improved

    #434369

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Примерно, на въпроса "какво научих от този филм?", веднага мога да отговря следното : Нищо! Но затова пък сега мразя балканците, диваците му с диваци!

    Hah, when I did the opposite – the film helped me somewhat outgrew … hmm, "provincial my limited worldview" and look around to see that we are not alone in the Balkans and we are not so different and isolated as I thought. Well, then I was a lot younger on, almost a teenager, and I had little time to poizrastna …

    But, yes, it is a pity that deliberately negative end somewhat spoils the otherwise interesting film that has many potential. Especially if the author was shaken and farther outside the Balkans – to show that the authorship of the melody can be Armenian, Jewish, Italian, etc., that has come to Lebanon, Iran, Bengal and where you have not (not to mention that had at least and Romania included, as is traveled only Balkans).

    Quote:
    a lot has changed since 2003, nineties rhetoric is rarely heard nowadays (although it is still present) people have moved on with their lives and "interethnic" relations have improved

    Hmm, perhaps you're right. Maybe they have indeed improved, but IMO it's just a little, and that improvement can easily be reverted, if we get hit by a wave of nationalism, like that of the Westerners. And I'm afraid that most of this improvement comes from the globalization, which tends to melt everything and erase differences, instead of leading to an understanding of those differences, i.e. it leads us all into one cultural pot, instead of having us presereve our cultures, while also appreciating those of others. Which isn't really much of an improvement – just a (possibly) lesser evil.

    #434370

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Хах, при мен пък е точно обратното – филмът ми помогна донякъде да надрасна… хмм, "провинциалния ми ограничен мироглед" и да се огледам наоколо, да видя, че всъщност не сме сами на Балканите и съвсем не сме толкова различни и изолирани, колкото си мислех. Е, то тогава бях и доста по-млад де, почти тийнейджър, та ми беше време да поизрастна малко…

    Но, да, жалко е, че преднамерено-негативният край донякъде разваля иначе интересния филм, който има немалко потенциал. Особено ако авторката се беше разтърсила и по-надалеч, извън Балканите – да покаже, че авторството на мелодията може да е арменско, еврейско, италианско и т.н., че е стигнала и до Ливан, Иран, Бенгал и къде ли още не (да не говорим, че трябваше поне и Румъния да включи, като е тръгнала да обикаля само Балканите).

    Probably too critical I put it, but something I do not like the idea. And mild ridicule me smells, but this is my personal opinion! (mainly end)

    Reminds me of another "documentary" our film quite well was exported abroad: it came to some gypsies with bears in the streets of the capital. If you remember his name, write it here. Otherwise it is of no interest except that to show that Bai Ganyovskoto best exported as something tsvetuchno and typically generates interest. :)

    #434371

    Anonymous

    The Turkish origin of the song is the most probable.

    #434372

    Anonymous

    What an awfull movie! How could she act so disgusting towards the people in Vranje and in Strandzha just to provoke some drama and to spice up the movie a little bit. Very cheap behaviour.

    I liked the Albanian version of the song the most TBH.

    #437964

    Anonymous

    Sorry for resurrecting my old topic, but I recently found even a traditional Arabic version of the tune in the soundtrack of Civ6 (with the same type of “No, this is my song!” comment-wars between Turks and Arabs). And in the end it seems to be a Sephardic Jewish tune, which the Arabs (and then Turks) spread across the world…
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lQRANSZLwhY

    #437985

    Anonymous

    Well it’s ours now.

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