• This topic has 6 voices and 16 replies.
Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 18 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #344386

    Anonymous

    Have you ever wondered why the trunks of so many trees in Ukraine are painted white??  It’s apparently an ongoing national debate in the country. Many people say it helps protect trees from bugs, and many say it’s pointless and ugly–a habit from Soviet times. Kyiv recently banned the painting of curbs and tree trunks white, so it seems like things may be changing. 

    What are your thoughts? Do you like seeing freshly painted trees in the spring? Have you ever seen painted trees in other countries? Lastly, do you know why people do it? People want to know this! Share any information you have on this weird tree painting.

    Here’s a link to the article  about the ban in Kyiv: https://kiev.pravda.com.ua/news/58e38… Video shot in Lviv. You’ll see that everything has been painted–from birch trees to the concrete electric pole!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CTQlIjaIC2s

    #436822

    Anonymous

    Why do these trees need to be protected from bugs?

    #436823

    Anonymous

    @Svelad Good question! We don’t paint trees white where I live. I’m curious about this practice. Here a man white washes trees in Kirovograd, Ukraine.

    #436824

    Anonymous

    It seems that people got used to it so much that they paint everything they can. E.g. lampposts, power poles etc.

    #436825

    Anonymous

    @Karpivna

    It’s not just white. It’s ‘lime’ to prevent bugs as Svevlad pointed . Trees are painted in such way all over eastern Europe.

    #436828

    Anonymous

    Eh, this reminds me I’ve forgotten for a straight second year to whitewash our trees here. I wonder if it’s perhaps not too late…
    Otherwise, we whitewash them, as far as I know, indeed because of protection (from bugs or ants or worms or something) and aesthetic values. You know, back in the old days, people around this time of year used to whitewash their rooms as well, to sanitize them in a spring cleaning of a sorts. Lampposts etc. though – that’s just silly. If you want to paint it so much, then paint it in the colours of the national flag, as some people here do.

    #436831

    Anonymous

    But it makes the trees look ugly. 

    #436835

    Anonymous

    Painted trees look ugly. People didn’t have sprays to prevent bugs. So they used ‘lime’ to paint the root of the tree.

    #436840

    Anonymous

    What do you mean “ugly”? They look well-kept.

    #436858

    Anonymous

    Not the roots obviously, the lower part of the trunk. It’s for protection against parasites. That’s what well tended trees look like. In the army we used to paint the curbs too, but not with lime and we alternated black and white. It looks fresh and clean. Bug spray doesn’t cut it – you can’t spray big trees.

    #436861

    Anonymous

    It is not natural to paint trees and plants.

    #436862

    Anonymous

    @aaaaa

    My father served in military in east Germany. He was saying they painted leaves of trees in green colour in late autumn, when important personnel were visiting them.

    #436863

    Anonymous

    @Karpivna it’s not natural to plant them either. If you go for natural what you’ll get will be briars and weeds. Oh yeah, and neither is mowing the grass, which in most of the US you are required by law to do. That’s pretty bland if you ask me.
    @Sviatogor – likely he was pulling your leg.

    #436866

    Anonymous

    @aaaaa
    >likely he was pulling your leg.

    I don’t think so, after reading stories of soldiers of they did in soviet military.

    #436875

    Anonymous

    Still think he was taking you for a ride, and I’ve seen stuff while in the army.
    For example, our company commander ordered the APCs polished with motor oil for a parade of sorts.
    When they came back the dust had stuck like glue to them so the drivers (who were also responsible for maintenance) had to rub them with gasoline for hours to get that shit off.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 18 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.