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  • #346394

    Anonymous

    I think it is a Germanic loan word, as it sounds similar to Hi and Hey.

    #430109

    Anonymous
    #430110

    Anonymous

    Because they're pirates!

    #430111

    Anonymous

    Why not? :) I think it sounds really nice. I don't think it's a Germanic loanword and even if it was, it doesn't matter because many Slavic countries in German vicinity (Poland, Czechia, Slovenia etc.) have German influences. It is common among elderly Poles to still greet people using "serwus", and I am sure many other Slavs do also (to my knowledge, Western Ukrainians also do).

    #430112

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Why not? :) I think it sounds really nice.

    It sounds very welcoming and non-threatening. You can't really imagine a gangster saying "Ahoj, where's me money?" ;D

    Quote:
    It is common among elderly Poles to still greet people using "serwus", and I am sure many other Slavs do also (to my knowledge, Western Ukrainians also do).

    Stajerc (one of our Slovenian members) uses it. I think it's part of his dialect.

    #430113

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Because they're pirates!

    Ahoj hoj hoj and a bottle of rum!

    #430114

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    It sounds very welcoming and non-threatening. You can't really imagine a gangster saying "Ahoj, where's me money?"

    Indeed you can't. I imagine that Czech and Slovak gangsters would have problem to be threatening because Czech and Slovak languages are so gentle and little bit funny sounding (to me) sometimes. :D

    ;DStajerc (one of our Slovenian members) uses it. I think it's part of his dialect.

    It obviously comes from times of Hapsburgs and Austro-Hungarian Empire and Slovenia is no exception. It would not surprise me if also Czechs, Hungarians, Slovaks, Croatians and possibly even Romanians (from Transylvania and Bucovina anyway) and Bosnians use it (older generation).

    #430115

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    It obviously comes from times of Hapsburgs and Austro-Hungarian Empire and Slovenia is no exception. It would not surprise me if also Czechs, Hungarians, Slovaks, Croatians and possibly even Romanians (from Transylvania and Bucovina anyway) and Bosnians use it (older generation).

    Right Wilko, older people, but also many other Slovaks (rather men than women), say Serus or Servus.

    Slovaks and Czechs use Slavic greetings as well: Nazdar or Zdravím.

    #430116

    Anonymous

    The greetings AHOJ was spread in Czech republic via czech tramping and river-boating unofficial organizations, mostly between I and II wars and then was widely accepted over country in whole population.

    http://domov-trampu.home.comcast.net/~domov-trampu/Tramping.htm

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Czech_tramping

    https://www.google.cz/images?hl=cs&gbv=2&sa=X&oi=image_result_group&ei=jwkjU9jzB8noswa3l4DQCw&ved=0CCoQsAQ&q=trampov%C3%A9&tbm=isch

    http://www.prebral.net/dok/trampflk.pdf

    #430117

    Anonymous
    #430118

    Anonymous
    #430119

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    ;D Stajerc (one of our Slovenian members) uses it. I think it's part of his dialect.

    Indeed, it's kind of part of our dialect, really a lot of people here use Serbus to greet their friends, both for "hi" and "bye". And so do I, as you might have noticed. It's the same as Servus in Austrian or other languages of the former Austrian-Hungarian monarchy. It comes from Latin, ikd what it means there tbh, we don't bother with that – we just use it. :)

    Btw, ahoj is an awesome greeting. Is "ahojte" also possible to say?

    #430120

    Anonymous

    Random trivia:
    1 It is germanic
    2. It is a nautical term.
    3. It's not related to heil, heilsa etc, according to wikipedia

    #430121

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Btw, ahoj is an awesome greeting. Is "ahojte" also possible to say?

    Yeah, but it's used mainly in Slovakia and it's used to greet a group of people.

    #430122

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Yeah, but it's used mainly in Slovakia and it's used to greet a group of people.

    Yes, I also thought it's used in plural cases. Interesting, only in Slovakia? Nice to know. :)

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