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  • #346222

    Anonymous

    [img width=700 height=466]http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/xq90/834/j273.jpg”/>

    By Claudine Zap. If snow and cold weather where you live has you down, be glad you're not a resident of Yakutsk. The Siberian outpost, population 270,000, is said to be the coldest city in the world, according to the Guardian and other reports.

    Located 3,100 miles by air from Moscow, the remote city in the far east of Russia hits temperatures as low as -49 degrees Fahrenheit. Friday's forecast is a frigid -42 degrees Fahrenheit.

    That seems almost balmy compared with the coldest recorded temperature: -83 degrees Fahrenheit, according to the Moscow Times.

    While the extremely low mercury would send most of us into hibernation, locals continue with their daily life, which means going outside in extreme conditions, bundled up from head to toe in parkas, furs, and woolens. Like in this video:

    51 in Yakutsk, Yakutia, Siberia Russia Walking YouTube

    This kind of cold is no joke: In addition to weather so severe it can give you frostbite while running errands, there's also the freezing fog, which limits visibility to 20 or 30 feet.

    Despite these obvious weather challenges, the city, located along the Lena River, about 280 miles south of the Arctic Circle, is a major port town. It is also the site of diamond and gold extraction, along with oil and gas production — which has the side benefit of keeping the "frost encrusted houses" in steady supply of much-needed heat.

    Many homes are built on stilts because of the year-round permafrost, notes Lonely Planet. When the short-lived spring arrives, icy roads turn to muddy muck. It's the one time of year when residents can't cross the usually iced-over river — which has no bridge.

    Summers, by the way, are short, hot and mosquito filled, so maybe year-round winter doesn't seem so bad after all.

    Yakutsk, Russia. (Photo: Amos Chapple)

    Source

    #426351

    Anonymous

    Yes,it is the capitol of the Sakha (Yakuts) people.There was a nice Russian documentary about how global warming threathens it.The city is built on pylons embeded into permafrost,but as the temperatures get higher the ground starts to melt,and the pylons start to shift underground,causing the buildings to crack.

    #426352

    Anonymous

    I think Scynthian was posting already something about the town. Not sure how people manage to live there….it blows my mind how do their car batteries work at -40/50 … i mean, as soon as it's -10 here cars already have problems with batteries and can't start normally.

    #426353

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I think Scynthian was posting already something about the town. Not sure how people manage to live there….it blows my mind how do their car batteries work at -40/50 … i mean, as soon as it's -10 here cars already have problems with batteries and can't start normally.

    lada is mystery for us 8)

    #426354

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I think Scynthian was posting already something about the town. Not sure how people manage to live there….it blows my mind how do their car batteries work at -40/50 … i mean, as soon as it's -10 here cars already have problems with batteries and can't start normally.

    The police vans patrol the city the entire night in search of the drunk people,making sure they don't fall asleep and freeze to death.So every evening they round them up in the prison,and release them in the morning.It takes some 10 minutes to die in the cold.

    #426355

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    The police vans patrol the city the entire night in search of the drunk people,making sure they don't fall asleep and freeze to death.So every evening they round them up in the prison,and release them in the morning.It takes some 10 minutes to die in the cold.

    Yeah, but i was always wondering as mentioned in my post how their car batteries work at -40°. They usually die on my car as soon as combo of -10° and one day of not driving hits.

    #426356

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Yeah, but i was always wondering as mentioned in my post how their car batteries work at -40°. They usually die on my car as soon as combo of -10° and one day of not driving hits.

    I think they don't turn off the engine for the duration of the winter.

    #426357

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I think Scynthian was posting already something about the town. Not sure how people manage to live there….it blows my mind how do their car batteries work at -40/50 … i mean, as soon as it's -10 here cars already have problems with batteries and can't start normally.

    temperatures are in degrees fahrenheit, not celsius  ;)
    if i count well, -40 f equals -9 C

    Quote:
    lada is mystery for us 8)

    its a mystery to every sane engineer  ;D

    Quote:
    I think they don't turn off the engine for the duration of the winter.

    i think they use car battery rechargers

    #426358

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Yeah, but i was always wondering as mentioned in my post how their car batteries work at -40°. They usually die on my car as soon as combo of -10° and one day of not driving hits.

    Everything you ever want to know about Yakutia  ;D
    http://askyakutia.com/2009/10/how-do-you-prepare-your-car-for-the-winter-in-yakutia/

    #426359

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    temperatures are in degrees fahrenheit, not celsius  ;)

    Nope in celsius.

    Quote:

    Ah the amazing battery blankets. I had no idea that exists actually :D thought it did cross my mind once it would be cool if i placed some blanked across the acumulator during the night so it doesn't freeze and could start up fast in the morning :D

    #426360

    Anonymous

    temps in the article are in fahrenheit

    #426361

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    temps in the article are in fahrenheit

    I know, but i was talking about celsius, and that wasn't the point anyway but rather the question how do they keep their batteries alive on low temperatures as below -50°C which was measured in Yakutsk :D

    Off topic…i think electric cars as Tesla motors and such modern stuff just wouldn't work in Yakutsk, Siberia, Alaska and similar regions.

    #426362

    Anonymous

    What's the lowest temperature have you experienced? -38C in Kurgan, southern Ural, Russia for me. :)

    #426363

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    What's the lowest temperature have you experienced? -38C in Kurgan, southern Ural, Russia for me. :)

    -34-35° in Lika region where my grandparents live.

    Its a pretty, mountinous and still full of wild-life area of Croatia.
    [img width=700 height=518]http://www.jutarnji.hr/multimedia/archive/00540/lika_zalaz1_540811S0.jpg” />

    #426364

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    -34-35° in Lika region where my grandparents live.

    Its a pretty, mountinous and still full of wild-life area of Croatia.

    The low temperatures between -30-40C are not as bad as some people may think. As long as there's no wind.

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